April 3, 2012
Behind the Scenes: “Thriller Jacket”

A black and red calf leather jacket is among the most recognizable and famous garments of the 20th century.  This jacket has been described as “the greatest piece of rock and roll memorabilia in history.”  The iconic jacket was worn by Michael Jackson in his “Thriller” video in 1983.  One of the most famous jackets and I get to frame it.  Well, at least a replica of the jacket since the original is currently in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

This replica was designed by Marc Laurent and cut to the King of Pop’s exact measurements.  The jacket features an exact print of Michael’s signature and actual autographs from the remaining Jackson 5 members; Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, and Marlon Jackson on the inside lining.

A piece of rock and roll history deserves a one of a kind custom frame.  Framing this jacket came with a few challenges. One challenge was showing the signatures on the inside lining without taking away from the piece. Another challenge was a conservation challenge of  how to mount the jacket while preserving it. It took some time but the jacket is mounted on a black glossy mat without adhesives or being sewn through.  To have some added dimension and structure to the jacket it is stuffed with acid-free materials.

  

To fit the depth of the jacket a 2” gold and wood panel frame was cake-stacked; (moulding is set 90 degrees on it’s side to create depth and topped with another frame. The face of the bottom frame is now the side.) Then topped with a custom wrapped red leather frame to match the leather of the jacket. 

For an added custom touch the glass was hand-painted with Michael’s silhouette and Thriller logo. Michael’s silhouette was painted on the inside of the glass in silver and placed to float over the jacket.  The Thriller logo was painted in red with touches of black and placed to fill some negative space at the bottom of the frame.


All elements placed together with a few finishing touches; here is the finished piece.  A one of a kind custom frame for an iconic jacket.

March 2, 2012
Turn a candid photo into a cool wall collage. We created this look by printing a large 30x40 photo in varies tones: color, black & white, sepia. Photo was then cropped into 8 sections and individually framed using Larson-Juhl Confetti white frame.

Turn a candid photo into a cool wall collage. We created this look by printing a large 30x40 photo in varies tones: color, black & white, sepia. Photo was then cropped into 8 sections and individually framed using Larson-Juhl Confetti white frame.

February 18, 2012
Rosie the Riveter; Framing an American Icon

“Rosie the Riveter” is the name of a female character that came to symbolize the real women who filled America’s factories, munitions plants, and shipyards during World War II.  In later years, Rosie also became an iconic American image in the fight to broaden women’s rights.  Rosie appeared on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post; painted by Norman Rockwell. The Post was then one of the nation’s most popular magazines, with a circulation of about 3 million copies each week.  

 Rockwell’s illustration features a brawny woman taking her lunch break with a rivet gun on her lap and beneath her Penny loafer a copy of Hitler’s manifesto, Mein Kampf. Her lunch pail reads “Rosie”; viewers quickly recognized this to be “Rosie the Riveter” from the familiar song. The Post's cover image proved hugely popular, and the magazine loaned it to the U.S. Treasury Department for the duration of the war, for use in war bond drives. 

Here are the details of framing an original issue of The Saturday Evening Post; May 29, 1943. Featuring “Rosie the Riveter” 

original issue of The Saturday Evening Post; May 29, 1943. Featuring Rosie the Riveter

Since Rosie is truly an American icon. An icon demands to be artistically framed.  The customer wanted the piece to be substantial but not overly done or large.  We felt the best way to showcase the magazine and preserve the integrity of the piece would be to see the entire magazine.

The magazine is first floated on a dark blue mat. The top mat is raised and set away from the magazine in order to show it in its entirety. A gold fillet was added to the top mat to integrate the gold of the frame. We hand-painted the top mat with watercolors to extend the flag image from the magazine’s cover.  All finished off with an American style gold frame that has rope knot detailing.

 Framed Rosie the Riveter

 September 1943, the Magazine War Guide was asking magazine publishers to participate in a “Women at Work Cover Promotion.” They needed women to work in all kinds of jobs, not just those in munitions plants or military-related factory work.  Everyday “civilian jobs” were vital, too.  The slogan for this promotion was: “The More Women at Work the Sooner We Win.”  The Saturday Evening Post once again asked for Norman Rockwell to create a cover.  For this cover, Rockwell created “Rosie to the Rescue”; a portrayal of an American ‘liberty girl’ dressed in patriotic clothes cast as a ‘jack-of-all-trades’composite, capable of doing any number of civilian jobs – nurse, mechanic, telephone operator, milkman, farmer, etc. to help the War effort.

Original issue of The Saturday Evening Post; September 4, 1943.

The customer wanted this piece to work as a set with the “Rosie the Riveter” magazine but not be matching pair exactly. In order to incorporate the two magazines we used the same American style gold frame and hand-painted a mat as well.  This magazine was floated on a dark green mat. The top mat was set back from the magazine to show the entirety as we did with Rosie the Riveter. 

We hand-painted the top mat with watercolors to resemble an American quilt. 

Framed Rosie to the Rescue

June 15, 2011
Framed vintage album covers. Including original records. Just $39.99. Great Father’s Day gift idea!

Framed vintage album covers. Including original records. Just $39.99. Great Father’s Day gift idea!

June 3, 2011
Custom Sgraffito Frame

A sunny day in the park makes a perfect engagement session. This amazing moment was captured by Justin Bass of Justin Bass Photography.  If you are looking for a wedding photographer you will not be disappointed. I guarantee you.


Now about the framing…This frame is the perfect demonstration of what we can do. We chose an old world frame style while giving the essence of modern touches. The frame was hand-crafted, finished-cornered and water-gilded (the oldest method of applying gold leaf.  Leafed only by hand, produces a luster and richness unmatched by any other method of gilding.)  with 22kt white gold by a master artisan.  It was finished off with a sgraffito (A technique where a top layer of color is scratched to reveal a color beneath.  the term comes from the Italian word Sgraffire meaning (literally) “to scratch”.) leaf design on blue background throughout the frame. For an added personal touch the couple’s names and wedding date were custom sgraffitto at the bottom. Custom framing is an old world trade and this frame showcases that.  In this case we wanted to add a touch of modern aesthetics, although it is hard to see in this picture the white gold was not antiqued as to show the brilliance of the gold which gives it the modern appeal. The piece also includes double silk mats with a fillet and UV filtered near zero reflection museum glass.

Scgraffito frame

Name Closeup